Child Arrangements Order

  • Author: Marie Stock
  • Posted on: 26th March 2018
  • Posted in: Blog

What is a Child Arrangement Order & how does it work?

Separating or divorcing can be very stressful, particularly where children are also involved. Sometimes, it can be difficult to agree on arrangements for contact or even with whom the child/children should live.

More often than not, an agreement can be reached through meaningful negotiations (directly, through solicitors or during mediation).

However, where this is not possible, one can apply to the Court for a Child Arrangement Order. Such an Order regulates arrangements relating to residence and contact.

When reaching a decision, the Court will consider the 'best interests' of the child/children.

Notably:-

(a) The ascertainable wishes and feelings of the child concerned (considered in the light of his or her age and understanding)

(b) His or her physical and emotional and educational needs

(c) The likely affect on him or her of any change in his or her circumstances

(d) His or her age, sex, background and any other characteristics which the Court considers relevant

(e) Any harm which he or she has suffered or is at risk of suffering;

(f) How capable are each of the child’s parents or any other person of meeting the child’s needs (where the Court considers the question  to be relevant)

(g) The range of powers available to the Court under the Children Act in the proceedings in question.

How do I find out more about this?

We understand that the prospect of Child Arrangement Proceedings can be daunting.

Our experienced family lawyers can advise on all types of Child Arrangement issues. We have an excellent reputation for our empathetic, constructive and firm approach.

We offer a FREE, confidential and no-obligation 30-minute consultation to discuss your concerns and options moving forward. We also will discuss the costs and in some cases, we can offer fixed fees.

Get in touch today on 01273 734 600, email advice@crosbywoods.co.uk

Marie Stock, Solicitor